Pirates in the Park – Sea Festival 2014

Published on Aug 31, 2014 White Rock Sea Festival, Pirates in the Park (65th year, 2014) It was the 65th celebration for the Sea Festival and the Kidz Zone in the beautiful Semiahmoo First Nation Park. Everything was awesome! With Capt’n Korki at the helm, and MC’d by Max Tell, the two day ‘green, free’ festival was one of the most memorable.It was a weekend of family festivity with amazing weather and an awesome turnout. Welcomed by JoAnne Charles, and our Mayor Baldwin, the little pirates and princesses paraded up Marine Drive along with the colourful band, Fanny Starchild and the Mystiques, to the beautiful Semiahmoo Park. On a hot august day, the protective shade and intimate atmosphere ignited in a spirit of festivity. The Semiahmoo Park is situated on East Beach and was graciously hosted by our Semiahmoo First Nation people, complete with a traditional salmon BarBQ. From a distance one could see the rolling hills, the magnificent old trees. One could see a big inflate able jumping castle, tents, and bubbles galore. The winners of the best pirate costume was picked by Mayor Baldwin, which he loved because it was a family of three generations. There was Ariel the Mermaid, the Teddy bear Picnic and march and continuous live entertainment for the children on the Spirit Stage throughout the day. Clowns, sounds, little pirates and princesses, mascots, magic, face painting, balloon twisting, petting zoo, hula hoops, and bubbles galore. Photos and production by Sherron Fairbairn, video by Ron Fairbairn and music by Vegari...

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The King of Hearts – Sher’s Chairs

This is the King of Hearts. This old unwanted Spanish style chair was a challenge.  With my first two chairs, Inspired by a Peony and A Bird in a Hat is Worth Two in the Bush , the painting styles were more loose. Each chair that I find seems to take on its own character. What to do, what on earth to do with this chair?  Hmmm.  Being that this chair seemed kind of regal, and masculine, a thought of a King came to mind. Why not the King of Hearts?   My  study of this playing card had me a little concerned because Modern playing cards are filled with layers of meaning and symbolism that can be traced back centuries. The king of hearts is sometimes called the “suicide king” because he appears to be sticking his sword into his head. However, it is debated whether or not the sword and hand holding it actually belong to the king, due to a different design pattern that could indicate someone else stabbed him. The King of Hearts was dubbed Charles, presumably after Charlemagne. He’s the only king without a mustache, the only king doing something active with his weapon. The mystery deepens with an examination of that weapon, however: According to Wikipedia, it’s been suggested that because Charlemagne’s sword does not exactly match the weapons held by the other kings. I am not a person who is into tarot card reading, etc. but I had to find a better reason to paint the King of Hearts.   Here’s what I found. This is an extremely affectionate King who is looking for love and an emotional connection. He wants to settle down and is very family minded and is not afraid to show how he feels. A fair-haired man with a good nature; or a man with Water signs predominating in his chart – a fair, affectionate, caring man, offering helpful advice – this man helps you out without much talk. His actions reveal his kindness and...

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Inspired by a Peony- Sher’s Chairs

This was my first ‘Sher’s Chairs’ chair. I was inspired to do a still life painting of a handful of these red gorgeous peonies that I brought home out of a neighbours garden. The painting had been hanging on my wall for awhile and my friend and past partner Linda Locke, thought I might be intrigued to get involved with restoring old chairs and paint the seats. Well, I was all for that. The chair has a very happy home...

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A Bird in A Hat is Worth Two in the Bush

  In the winter of 2012, a flock of about 35 Pine Sisken’s (finch – family)-congregated to our patio for the whole winter. Being very sensitive to the cold they were freezing their little asses off and took shelter in our Laurel hedge. They are social birds, and this one sat on my shoulder and snuggled into my neck to get warm. He even tried to come into our home on foot.  One day, I found this little guy perched on my straw hat just outside our door. I grabbed my camera to catch this amazing moment, we looked each other in the eye as he posed for the shot. About the Pine Siskens  Pine Sisken are song birds, have a listen: http://sherron.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Pine-Siskin-1-Song-and-calls.wav Sadly, this little guy didn’t survive the winter. In memory, I decided to do a painting of him.  A year later, I decided to do something unique with this finished painting. I found a forgotten beautiful ladder chair in a Thrift Store and got to work. The chair itself was a handful because it had not been looked after for a very long time.    ...

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Savannah- Hope At The Grassroots

Since I was an eight year old  girl, Africa had always fascinated me. My Gramma lived in an old brick house in Ontario. She was a nurse and caretaker in her home of some elderly ladies. Because these ladies were bed ridden there meals were carried to them on trays. And, there were a lot of stairs to climb. On visit’s to Gramma’s house we would help by carrying their meals  to them. I was taken by Mrs. English, one elderly lady, and would carry a lunch to her on a tray. She had stacks and stacks of National Geographic magazines beside her bed on the floor. I would sit for hours beside her on the floor while she would brush and braid her very long white hair, and gaze at the amazing photography of Africa. Those were great memories as I would pretend, that I was on an adventure   “In my eyes, Savannah became real. Her mysterious personality unveiled a proud and regal woman. I envision Savannah always holding her head up high with grace, looking to the future.” What started out as a painting project, became ‘Savannah-Hope at the Grassroots’. CELEBRATING AFRICAN GRANDMOTHERS, HEROES OF THE CONTINENT A juried art exhibition, toured across Western Canada for 9 months. The Royal City Gogos are part of a nation-wide movement of +5,000 grandmothers and grand-others who contribute to the Grandmothers Campaign of the Stephen Lewis Foundation. They fundraise in support of African grandmothers caring for a generation of children who have been orphaned by the AIDS pandemic. These children are the future hope of Africa. To date, the Grandmothers Campaign has raised +$16.5...

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Why White Rock?

We lived among the beautiful majestic mountains in North Vancouver for three years, and banked in with clouds and rain, was proving to be challenging on my disposition. It was 1984, totally saturated with rain and dark skies, I noticed off in the distance a blue shape in the sky. I asked my husband, Ron, “Honey, what’s that blue spot in the sky?” and he replied, “That’s south my dear, and it is probably White Rock.” Well, after a bit of a drive and an unforgettable visit to this seaside community, that boasts the lowest rainfall in Greater Vancouver, we packed and moved a month later to this very special place, where we still reside today.   The city of White Rock is named after a 486-ton boulder that stands on the crescent shaped beach of Semiahmoo Bay. Geologists say: “that it was deposited here as the result of a glacial erratic that migrated south during the last glaciation,” and As Legend Goes, the Gulf of Georgia was ruled by a Sea God who was worshipped by the Cowichan natives long before the arrival of the discoverers. For fun, look at the ‘Historical Perspective’ the title of a series of articles written by Lorraine and Hugh Ellenwood. White Rock is a charming seaside city located on beautiful Semiahmoo Bay, and the first stop traveling north from the USA, at the historical Peace Arch border crossing. White Rock has a colourful and rich beginning, starting with its First Nation inhabitants, and with its folklore and culture.  A row of cottages was built for the customs officers near what is now the Peace Arch border crossing. Because, of its mild weather, its beautiful setting of land and water, and its laid back atmosphere, one can trace its roots as a holiday destination. Without getting too historically accurate, I think it’s clear that White Rock’s beginning as a resort area was fitting. As far back as the early 1900’s holiday campers would arrive by train traveling on newly laid tracks, steamships, and Model A automobiles. They were drawn by the warm, relaxed atmosphere. White Rock is growing up There are a superb array of restaurants, bed & breakfasts, a waterfront hotel and unique blend of shops & boutiques. Uptown White Rock host’s activities, recreational programs and facilities including shopping,...

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