Savannah- Hope At The Grassroots

Savannah- Hope at the Grass Roots

Since I was an eight year old  girl, Africa had always fascinated me. My Gramma lived in an old brick house in Ontario. She was a nurse and caretaker in her home of some elderly ladies. Because these ladies were bed ridden there meals were carried to them on trays. And, there were a lot of stairs to climb. On visit’s to Gramma’s house we would help by carrying their meals  to them.

I was taken by Mrs. English, one elderly lady, and would carry a lunch to her on a tray. She had stacks and stacks of National Geographic magazines beside her bed on the floor. I would sit for hours beside her on the floor while she would brush and braid her very long white hair, and gaze at the amazing photography of Africa. Those were great memories as I would pretend, that I was on an adventure

 

“In my eyes, Savannah became real. Her mysterious personality unveiled a proud and regal woman. I envision Savannah always holding her head up high with grace, looking to the future.” What started out as a painting project, became ‘Savannah-Hope at the Grassroots’.

CELEBRATING AFRICAN GRANDMOTHERS, HEROES OF THE CONTINENT

A juried art exhibition, toured across Western Canada for 9 months. The Royal City Gogos are part of a nation-wide movement of +5,000 grandmothers and grand-others who contribute to the Grandmothers Campaign of the Stephen Lewis Foundation. They fundraise in support of African grandmothers caring for a generation of children who have been orphaned by the AIDS pandemic. These children are the future hope of Africa. To date, the Grandmothers Campaign has raised +$16.5 million. 

1 Comment

  1. brenda ford

    Impossible for me to pick my favorite of your artwork. You are one in a million and your work sets itself apart in many respects. Especially again since Africa is going through another catastrophe with ebola. I’m sure more of these wonderful grandmothers will be setting forth to help her daughter and grandchildren. You could not have captured the love of a mother any more than you did in Savannah.

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